Talk and ask for help

Hey there! We are making a pause to let you know that the info on this page is about topics like abuse and violence, which can cause a strong emotional reaction. If that happens, it can really help to talk to someone.

 

If you feel like something is wrong, trust that feeling and find someone you trust to talk with. Only about a third of young people who experience abuse talk about it. That means a lot of people who have been hurt are not getting support, and there can be long-term problems for people when they keep it to themselves.

 

Here are some good places to start

  • You can find support by calling the Pueblo Rape Crisis Services 24-hour hotline at 719-549-0549. The team offers case management among many other resources.

  • Love is Respect and call at 1-866-331-9474

  • National Human Trafficking Hotline: call 1-888-373-7888 or text 233733

  • The Trevor Project:  Call 1-866-488-7386 or text ‘START’ to 678-678    

 

What is sexual violence? 

Sexual violence is when a person has power and control over another person through unwanted or harmful sexual actions. Rape, sexual assault, and sexually harassing comments are examples of sexual violence. Sexual violence is a criminal act, and the person that suffers the assault is a crime victim. 

 

What is the difference between sexual assault and rape? 

Sexual assault is defined as any sexual contact to which the other person didn’t consent.

 

This can include

  • undoing or removing someone's clothing without their permission;

  • forcing sex or oral sex with someone without their permission;

  • using a sex toy on someone without their permission;

  • any unwanted sexual, or physical touching of someone without their permission.

 

Rape is a legal term that refers specifically to penetrative sex without consent. This includes vaginal sex, anal sex, fingering, and oral sex. All rape is sexual assault, but not all sexual assault is legally considered rape.

 

You’ve been sexually assaulted? 

If you have experienced a sexual assault, the first thing to do is find a safe place away from the abuser that hurt you. You can stay in your house, go to a friend or family member's house, find a police station, go to a hospital or call someone for support.

 

Suggested options if you are a crime victim

  • You can find support by calling the Pueblo Rape Crisis Services 24-hour hotline at 719-549-0549. The team offers case management among many other resources.

  • You can go to a hospital and be seen by a healthcare professional. Usually, a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (AKA SANE) assists victims of abuse. They will take you to a quiet room and talk to you confidentially. At the hospital,

    • a social worker will help you understand your rights and options;

    • you will get checked for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI);

    • you can ask for an emergency contraception pill;

    • you can ask to be treated by a therapist.

    • you can report to the police what happened, without leaving the hospital.

  • If you feel comfortable, call the police. If that is not a good option, you can decide later if you want to report the crime.

 

Keep in mind that

  • The consequences of what you suffered are real and you will probably experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms for months or years after the assault. This means that your memory might not work well because it is protecting your mind from remembering what happened, you will probably have nightmares and anxiety, and you will be very vulnerable in the following months — which is why talking with a therapist will help you move on.

  • Know that what happened wasn’t your fault — most victims feel like it was. You are a victim of a crime, and most importantly, you are a survivor and you have the right to receive immediate healthcare to recover from this incident both physically and emotionally.

  • Know that what happened doesn’t define you as a person but the determination to recover from this probably will — which is why is so important to ask for help.

 

Need help?

You can find support by calling the Pueblo Rape Crisis Services 24-hour hotline at 719-549-0549. The team offers case management among many other resources.

 

Resources about sexual violence

 

Pueblo Rape Crisis Services

Love is Respect Helpline: 1-866-331-9474 or text 'LOVEIS' to 22522

National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233

Deaf Services

Strong Hearts Native Helpline: 1-844-762-8483

National Human Trafficking Hotline: Call 1-888-373-7888 ( TTY: 711), Text 233733

Colorado Human Trafficking Hotline: Call 866-455-5075, Text 720-999-9724

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